Globalisation + Trade

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Australia is one of the most globalised nations in the world, with important relationships both within our region and further abroad. This year’s Poll asked Australians about the benefits of globalisation and the impact of free trade on Australian society and the economy.

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Globalisation and Trade

GLOBALISATION

Despite growing debate in other countries about the impact of globalisation, Australians remain broadly positive about its benefits. Continuing a strong upward trend over more than a decade, 78% of Australians believe globalisation is ‘mostly good for Australia’, up six points since 2008 and 14 points since 2006.

Even among the lowest income-earners, nearly three quarters (73%) see globalisation as ‘mostly good for Australia’.

Australians are more positive than Americans about the benefits of globalisation. In response to the same question asked by US think tank The Chicago Council on Global Affairs in mid-2016, 65% of Americans (13 points lower than in Australia) said globalisation was ‘good’ for the United States.

FREE TRADE

Free trade has similarly strong support among Australians. Over two-thirds (67%) of Australian adults think free trade is good for ‘[their] own standard of living’ and for the ‘Australian economy.’ A solid majority (61%) say free trade is good for Australian companies. A slightly smaller majority (55%) say free trade is good for ‘creating jobs in Australia.’ Only 35% see free trade as bad for jobs in Australia.

When last asked about free trade a decade ago, attitudes were more mixed. In 2007, 50% of Australians agreed that freer international trade ‘costs more Australian jobs than it creates,’ and 68% agreed that it ‘puts Australia at a disadvantage because of our high labour and environmental standards,’ yet 67% also agreed that it ‘helps to build prosperity, both in Australia and other parts of the world.’

Australians’ attitudes to free trade are more positive in 2017 than those of their American cousins. In response to the same question about trade in America asked by The Chicago Council on Global Affairs in mid-2016, smaller majorities than in Australia were positive about ‘international trade’ for the US economy and American companies, and a majority (59%) saw international trade as ‘bad’ for creating jobs in the United States.

In 2015, Australians expressed mixed views about free trade agreements such as those concluded in 2014 by the Coalition Government with Japan, Korea and China. Less than a majority (48%) saw them as good for the Australian economy, though fewer (30%) said they were bad for the economy. Regardless of the economic benefits however, a solid majority (65%) said they are good for Australia’s relations with those countries.

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Globalisation

Do you believe that globalisation, especially the increasing connections of our economy with others around the world, is mostly good or mostly bad for Australia?


  • HOW TO USE
    • Hover cursor over chart segments to view data. Click responses in the legend to switch individual results on and off.

close

Globalisation and Trade

GLOBALISATION

Despite growing debate in other countries about the impact of globalisation, Australians remain broadly positive about its benefits. Continuing a strong upward trend over more than a decade, 78% of Australians believe globalisation is ‘mostly good for Australia’, up six points since 2008 and 14 points since 2006.

Even among the lowest income-earners, nearly three quarters (73%) see globalisation as ‘mostly good for Australia’.

Australians are more positive than Americans about the benefits of globalisation. In response to the same question asked by US think tank The Chicago Council on Global Affairs in mid-2016, 65% of Americans (13 points lower than in Australia) said globalisation was ‘good’ for the United States.

FREE TRADE

Free trade has similarly strong support among Australians. Over two-thirds (67%) of Australian adults think free trade is good for ‘[their] own standard of living’ and for the ‘Australian economy.’ A solid majority (61%) say free trade is good for Australian companies. A slightly smaller majority (55%) say free trade is good for ‘creating jobs in Australia.’ Only 35% see free trade as bad for jobs in Australia.

When last asked about free trade a decade ago, attitudes were more mixed. In 2007, 50% of Australians agreed that freer international trade ‘costs more Australian jobs than it creates,’ and 68% agreed that it ‘puts Australia at a disadvantage because of our high labour and environmental standards,’ yet 67% also agreed that it ‘helps to build prosperity, both in Australia and other parts of the world.’

Australians’ attitudes to free trade are more positive in 2017 than those of their American cousins. In response to the same question about trade in America asked by The Chicago Council on Global Affairs in mid-2016, smaller majorities than in Australia were positive about ‘international trade’ for the US economy and American companies, and a majority (59%) saw international trade as ‘bad’ for creating jobs in the United States.

In 2015, Australians expressed mixed views about free trade agreements such as those concluded in 2014 by the Coalition Government with Japan, Korea and China. Less than a majority (48%) saw them as good for the Australian economy, though fewer (30%) said they were bad for the economy. Regardless of the economic benefits however, a solid majority (65%) said they are good for Australia’s relations with those countries.

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Free trade

Overall, do you personally think free trade is good or bad for each of the following:


  • HOW TO USE
    • Hover cursor over chart segments to view data. Click responses in the legend to switch individual results on and off.