Indonesia

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This year’s Poll repeated a question first asked in 2013 about democracy in Indonesia.

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Indonesia

Indonesia embarked on a process of transition and democratisation after the end of the Suharto regime late last century. In 2017, however, only 27% of Australians agree that ‘Indonesia is a democracy’, most of them ‘somewhat’ agreeing as opposed to ‘strongly’ agreeing (22% vs 5%). This is a seven-point fall since the question was last asked in 2015, when 34% of Australians held this view, one year after the 2014 election of President Joko Widodo.

One explanation for this may be Australians’ continuing lack of awareness about Indonesia. When asked a decade ago to name Indonesia’s leader, only 20% of Australians could do so. When asked whether they admired ‘Joko Widodo’ (Indonesia’s President) among a number of other world leaders in our 2015 Poll, nearly half (47%) of Australians were unable to answer.

Notwithstanding this lack of familiarity, almost all (91%) Australians said in our 2016 Poll that our relationship with Indonesia is important.

In our 2017 feelings thermometer, Australians’ feelings towards Indonesia reached their equal warmest level at 55° (although still middling in comparison with other nations on the thermometer). This consolidated a strong rebound to 54° in 2016 from a low of 46° in 2015, during the lead-up to the executions of Australians Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran.

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Is Indonesia a Democracy?

Now a question about Indonesia. Do you personally agree or disagree that Indonesia is a democracy? And is that strongly or somewhat?


  • HOW TO USE
    • Hover cursor over chart segments to view data. Click responses in the legend to switch individual results on and off.

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Indonesia

Indonesia embarked on a process of transition and democratisation after the end of the Suharto regime late last century. In 2017, however, only 27% of Australians agree that ‘Indonesia is a democracy’, most of them ‘somewhat’ agreeing as opposed to ‘strongly’ agreeing (22% vs 5%). This is a seven-point fall since the question was last asked in 2015, when 34% of Australians held this view, one year after the 2014 election of President Joko Widodo.

One explanation for this may be Australians’ continuing lack of awareness about Indonesia. When asked a decade ago to name Indonesia’s leader, only 20% of Australians could do so. When asked whether they admired ‘Joko Widodo’ (Indonesia’s President) among a number of other world leaders in our 2015 Poll, nearly half (47%) of Australians were unable to answer.

Notwithstanding this lack of familiarity, almost all (91%) Australians said in our 2016 Poll that our relationship with Indonesia is important.

In our 2017 feelings thermometer, Australians’ feelings towards Indonesia reached their equal warmest level at 55° (although still middling in comparison with other nations on the thermometer). This consolidated a strong rebound to 54° in 2016 from a low of 46° in 2015, during the lead-up to the executions of Australians Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran.

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2016: Indonesia’s Importance to Australia

In your personal view, how important is Indonesia to Australia?


  • HOW TO USE
    • Click segment of chart to isolate data